Skip to main content

About your Search

English 26
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
used to block a u.n. treaty. a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the world. hundreds of millions. the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities. it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the u.n. treaty. 125 countries ratified it. but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republican senators voted against it. there names are right there. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute. some had signaled support for the treaty and then indicated they'd vote for it only to vote against it. one of the measure's co-sponsored, jerry mirrand, actually voted against it. so the guy who co-sponsored it voted against it. we asked him to come on the program yesterday, today as well. he declined. a former senator got involved on this as well, rick santorum, whose 4-year-old daughter bella is disabled. he was o
things that just don't square with the fact. it's about a u.n. treaty that failed to be ratified by the senate. a treaty that was meant to encourage more countries to be more like the u.s. on equal rights of the disabled. if other countries adopted better treatment of their disabled, americans who visited or lived in other countries would also benefit. 125 countries ratified the treaty. it was supported by george bush, signed by the current president, and has support from both sides of the aisle like john mccain and bob dole. he was wheeled onto the senate floor, you can see, for the vote he hoped to see the treaty ratified. instead after pressure from special interest groups, 38 republicans vowing to support the treaty voted no. one was the home school legal defense association. the hslda, the powerful lobby group around the country whose leader you're about to meet. they have some very strong things to say about the treaty, but the notion was basically this, if it were to pass, they said, the u.n. treaty would somehow let the u.n. mandate how parents of disabled kids in america
into it. it's a long story, but stay with us. on tuesday the senate rejected a u.n. treaty aimed at protecting the rights of disabled people around the world. 125 other countries ratified this, but in the full senate 38 republicans voted no leaving the treaty five votes short of ratification. what we learned today that's interesting is some of these same senators actually supported the treaty before they voted against it. some even pledged their support very publicly. senator roy blunt of missouri was a flip-flopper and kay bailey hutchinson of texas and senator jerry moran of kansas. we asked them all to come on the program and they declined. they're silent on this. senator moran was a co-sponsor of the measure to ratify the treaty. he even put a press release back in may proclaiming his support. here he is with bob dole in june. dole, a war veteran, former republican senate leader is a long-time supporter of disability rights and a strong advocate of this treaty. just before tuesday's vote he came to the senate chamber 89 years old frail in his wheelchair. he thought it was tha
the u.s. passed 22 years ago. but 38 u. rep u.n. treaty leaving it five votes short of ratification. not even a rare visit by former republican senator bob dole who just before the vote made a difference. he's 89, appeared frail this his wheelchair and disabled from war injuries, came to the chamber to show support for this treaty. rick santorum led the charge against the treaty. he and some other republicans warned it would jeopardize u.s. sovereignty and personal freedoms. listen. >> the problem is, there's a provision in this international law which we would be adopting if the senate ratifies this that puts the state, the state in the position of determining what i in the best interest of a disabled child. >> i simply cannot support a tr that threatens the right of parents to raise their children with the constant looming threat of state interference. >> the treaty could be used to interfere with the ability of parents with disabled children to decide what action is in the best interest of their children. >> that all sounds very alarming. keeping them honest, it's not true. the t
with the -- with what happened in congress yesterday, the lack of support in the united states senate for the u.n. but the u.n. process really has to go forward and has to be the leader on syria. >> i just don't think it's helpful to americans when so many senior politicians trash the u.n. you know? it's the united nations. and actually, it's better for america. >> absolutely. >> the united nations takes a lot of the work on the ground in these places. >> you're absolutely right. but there's human rights abuses that are exploding all over the world. and one that we're working very hard on right now is in uganda. there's anti-homosexuality bill that would make homosexual acts punishment by the death penalty. >> completely outrageous. >> it is. and the speaker of the house there said she's going to deliver this bill as a christmas present. so, we have 2 1/2 weeks to stop that bill right now. >> imagine. it's disgusting, isn't it? >> it certainly is. as people across this state, we're in new york state. you don't need a passport to work on human rights. right here, we're working on the farm workers
the u.n. ambassador apparently because they think she's an easy target, then they even got a problem with me. >> senator mccain. >> thank you very much, mr. secretary. >> senator jokingly gave the post to senator john kerry. >> i think john kerry would be an excellent appointment and easily confirmed by his colleagues. >> he's also listed as a potential defense tair th secretary. ashton carter is on the list and former nebraska senator chuck hagel, a republican, could reach across the aisle. >> we're in a much stronger position today as a country than we were in '07. >> reporter: treasury secretary tim geithner says he'll stay. jack lew is an eventual replacement. people wondering if he would pick good cabinet members. 58% thought he would. 42% said he would not. emily schmidt, cnn, washington. >> emily, thank you. >>> also in washington, bo is back. front and center on the white house holiday card. michelle obama picked a personal could. it shows bo running across the snowy lawn. she called the moment very surreal. >>> she was married to peter jennings and the late ambassador peter
to be a clear and credible response. what should that be? >> well, we have a very strong resolution before the u.n. security council. it's likely china will try to water down those provisions but it's also certain that the provisions will pass. >> you don't think china will try to veto it? >> i don't think they will veto it. they don't want north korea doing this. >> china is the only ally that they really have. i wonder, do you think it's possible they didn't inform china in advance of the timing of this launch? >> it's possible they did not. people now suspect that the information that we had that north korea was moving its rocket, something was wrong with it, was it an intentional deceptive move? they thought there would be attempts to shoot it down. they wanted to fool japan. they succeeded. >> and it certainly does strengthen the new young leader kim jong-un domestically. >> absolutely. they have been trying since 1998 to launch a long-range missile and they failed in the previous four attempts. they succeeded in this. it's not a rocket that can deliver a major warhead. there are marriajor hu
released from the hospital. dole was pushing for passage of a u.n. treaty guaranteeing equal rights for the disabled. but his efforts were in vain. republicans blocked approval of the treaty, saying it threatens national sovereignty. >>> also, a political passing announced overnight. long-time texas congressman, jack brooks has died. you can see brooks in this very famous photograph of lbj being sworn in as president aboard air force one. he is standing just behind a grief-stricken jackie kennedy. brooks died last night in beaumont, texas, after a sudden illness. he was 89 years old. >>> overseas, now, where thousands of protesters remain in cairo's tahrir square, following yesterday's massive demonstration against president morsi. more than 100,000 demonstrators gathering in front of the presidential palace, further fueling tensions after morsi's power grab. tv stations in egypt have vowed to go black today as a sign of protest. >>> and in the southern philippines, the death toll is quickly rising after a ferocious typhoon. officials say more than 200 people have already died. that
missile technology. a senior administration official says the u.s. will wush for a u.n. security council resolution condemning the loss as well as possible sanctions. members began meeting behind closed doors about an hour ago. joining us is former new mexico governor bill richardson. gooz to see you. you're a former u.n. ambassador to the. does it concern you? >> it does concern me. my hope was that the new leader in north korea, kim jong-un, would pick a different path than his father, that he would be more moderate. i think still there's possibilities of dialogue. i'm not sure when. i think he did this for domestic reasons. the last missile launch failed. he only has one year in leadership. he wants to show his people that despite their economic problems, they have military and missile technolo technology, that they're a major power in space, militarilmilita buttress themselves with the north korean military. it was mainly a domestic shot he took, but also he said to the world, you have to deal with me. i'm a major player. >> so it's for domestic audience largely here. should the unit
bank and east jerusalem as a punitive measure after palestinians won a bid for upgraded status at the u.n. building here would link the settlement with jerusalem, a move the palestinians say would essentially cut the west bank in half and cut them off from what they hope will be the capital of any future palestinian state, east jerusalem. >> there is no chance for a palestinian state. it's impossible. i mean, anyone who would look at the maps, look at the geography would know exactly that this decision means that no more two-state solution. >> the israeli government says it believes the palestinians breached international treaties by going to the u.n. m first place and the decision to move ahead with the settlement construction is a direct response. israel's announcement to settle in the e1 area of the west bank has led to harsh reactions both from the united nations as well as countries around the world. nevertheless, israel says it stands by its decision and will not be deterred by international pressure. >>> west bank settlements like this one look almost like any other city in israel
is a provocation against all u.n. resolutions. >> it's a big difference, weaponizing with wmds or nukes. and maybe, victor, just weigh in on that. if there is this suspicion and if it bears any truth, that iran may have actually helped this process along, does that not equate to iran would be willing to help the process along in terms of nuclear warheads as well? >> that's entirely a possibility as well, ashleigh. i think that the relationship between iran and north korea, when it comes to this missile business, has been quite deep, quite robust. every iranian missile of the shahab design, from one through four, have all been north korean missiles. so there's a real history of cooperation there. and i would imagine that it would continue. with regard to whether this thing is a satellite or whatever it is, if the north koreans don't have control of it, that, to me, would not be that surprising, because they really don't have a full-fledged space program. they just disguise this as a space launch, but as the general said, this is clearly for a military application, before it is for a civilian applic
that was negotiated by republican president george herbert walker bush. it was signed by george walker bush at the u.n., and republican attorney general richard thornburg has testified the former attorney general of the united states, there's no legal requirement whatsoever for the united states to change anything. rick santorum was just not factual. what he did, he gave some people here an excuse to hide behind that when they know that there are people who hate the united nations, who don't want any united nations treaty. and so they gave them a reason to be able to say this is why i'm voting against it. we're going to come back with the hearings next year, again that will show people exactly what the facts are. we'll have all the witnesses in. i think it can be december positive. and ultimately, i would be prepared to put into the treaty language of the resolution of ratification language that can make it more clear than it is today if that will satisfy them. >> the other argument that some of these republicans were making at least to me privately over the past few days, when i was beginning to get
or not senators mccain and others are upset at the president. if you look at her u.n. record and, more importantly, her state department record, senator albright was furious with her and put her on probation. she has a terrible record among professional diplomats in the same -- i don't know if she was a terrible desk officer from ethiopia, genocide, which is the president says is one of his greatest regrets or mistakes, those were all on his watch. if she did such a terrible job there, how can she be a secretary? >> the president has been able to rehash that old garbage that mary is talking about. they have not done so now. they are talking about trumped-up charges and old regrets and on issues that, you know, would come out in a nomination hearing if she is nominated but i would just say, as an ambassador to the u.n., she's done an excellent job. she's served our country well and president obama ought to be able to make the choice based on who he wants as secretary of state. >> president clinton has told me on several occasions, mary and hilary, his greatest regret as far as being a president on
of bashir al assad's remaining allieses and u.n. officials don't believe the syrian president can survive this war. that is why there's this new diplomatic push to prepare a new syrian government. secretary clinton and the russian foreign minister agreed to revive a road map for a political transition. it calls for elections that include candidates from the syrian opposition. yesterday secretary clinton acknowledged it's going to be hard to do that while the violence is still raging. >> margaret what's the next step in the diplomatic efforts to resolve this hart? >>? this weekend the u.n. envoy to syria will meet with russia and u.s. to push negotiations. secretary clinton will have a summit morrow could. so that will allow the u.s. to funnel money and aid through the new political structure in order to help the rebels create a new government. >> margaret is the u.s. prepared to provide weapons? >> not likely. u.s. diplomats are advising them on,000 create a military command but not likely to give them arms. officials are concerned that they could fall into the hands
administration condemned it as a provocative act and will likely ask the u.n. security council to impose crippling sanctions. the pentagon following developments this morning. chris lawrence there. what do you know, chris? >> right now, officials say that object that north korea put into orbit, monitoring it, analyzing it, but they confirm it is in orbit. why is that important? the same technology you would use to put into orbit is the same technology you use to develop long-range ballistic missiles, the u.s. condemned this act. they are worried about the marriage of north korea's nuclear weapons with this long-range missile technology. this is the type of missile that if it was successful, as it appears to be, could reach parts of the united states, alaska, u.s. military bases in hawaii. but a u.s. efficiently i spoke with who used to work on north north korea for the defense department told me, there are still areas in which north korea has not made it as far as they would need to in terms of getting an accurate rocket, in terms of getting heat shielding, and in terms of making a nucle
for syria back on track, a u.n. effort that's stalled for so many months now. there's not a lot of hope it will get back on track anytime soon. a lot of international powers and pressure being put on syria to try to comply with some sort of peace plan so this nightmare scenario doesn't come to any sort of fruition. zoraida? >> all right, we're talking about a deadly nerve gas, it is sarin. can you tell us what kind of damage could this do to the people there? >> reporter: it's well known that sarin and the use of sarin is a nightmare scenario. the use of it could kill a huge amount of people in a very short amount of time. now, last night, a former cia officer, robert bear, was speaking to anderson cooper. he described what the use of sarin could do. here's more of what he had to say. >> one round and the dispersion on that could be -- depends on the wind -- but you could take out, let's say a city like homs, you could take out a third of the city in the first couple of hours. anderson, this is a highly toxic liquid. it's a persistent agent. it's absolutely completely deadly. >> reporte
as the u.n. envoy to syria. with so much concern about the threat of chemical weapons at this point, do you think there are any diplomatic options left? >> i think the play -- and hillary clinton met twice today with russian foreign minister lavrov -- is to get russia in the tent with the rest of the world. everyone has predicted, when facts on the ground change, russia will be there. this could be a reset moment for vladimir putin, and he could, because of his unique sway in the area, persuade, i would think, the bashar family to step aside and create a peaceful transition, like the transition in yemen. the opposition is now more broadly representative, and i would hope the russians would see that being on the wrong side of this just creates more carnage, more opportunity for terrorists to get traction there and won't help russia. >> it's a pivotal moment, as we say, a clear tipping point. glad you're back safe and sound from egyp. jane harman, thanks so much for coming in. the jersey shore about to meet the fiscal cliff. grim news for governor christie as he visits washington. >>> plus th
me now to discuss our hopes for our new k.i.n.d. tuition fund is my senior partner, carol stern, president and ceo of the u.s. fund for for unicef. thank you for joining me. >> it's great to be back. >> this is something that we started in your conference room in the unicef offices in malawi almost a year and a half ago and the girls' education issue is really critical there. i think what happened in pakistan shows how important it is for education. >> only 7% of girls complete secondary school there and we know a girl who finishes her education is less likely to contract hiv, less likely to be forced into prostitution or trafficked or even forced to marry early. it's an investment in a girl's entire future. it really is. >> it's one of the best schools that i saw in the capital city was the highest and we've calculated that the package that they need is roughly $177 a year. >> for the year. >> yes. and that includes room and board. that includes a lot of these kids -- they are not necessarily boarding schools but they live so far away, their village is so far away, they have to
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)